Thursday, June 25, 2015

Wimbledon Thread


My only note is that admitting to missed out-of-competition tests appears to be all the rage:

Mo Farah missed two drugs tests in buildup to 2012 Olympics, say reports 

Chris Froome: I missed a drugs test
I hope that the tennis press musters up the courage to question tennis stars about missed tests at Wimbledon. The most infamous missed test in tennis is, of course, Serena Williams's panic room incident, which resulted in no sample being collected.

However, Serena is far from the only top tennis player to have an attempted out-of-competition test result in no sample being collected. As documented by this site, in 2010, the ITF posted this document for its 2009 testing programme.

The following players were listed with an Out-of-Competition test for which there was a zero in each testing column (urine, blood, EPO):

1. Griffioen, Jiske 21/03/2009
2. Moya, Carlos 16/05/2009
3. Benneteau, Julien 20/05/2009
4. Karlovic, Ivo 31/05/2009
5. Stubbs, Rennae 12/06/2010
6. Nadal, Rafael 14/06/2009
7. Bolelli, Simone 15/06/2009
8. Williams, Serena 16/06/2009
9. Williams, Venus 16/06/2009
10. Acasuso, Jose 17/06/2009
11. Gravellier, Florence 18/06/2009
12. Mauresmo, Amelie 01/07/2009
13. Mathieu, Paul-Henri 07/07/2009
14. Sharapova, Maria 09/07/2009
15. Simon, Gilles 09/07/2009
16. Nestor, Daniel 15/07/2009
17. Vaidisova, Nicole 24/07/2009
18. Roddick, Andy 15/08/2009
19. Walraven, Sharon 18/08/2009
20. Huber, Liezel 24/08/2009
21. Del Potro, Juan Martin 26/08/2009
22. Hantuchova, Daniela 26/08/2009
23. Pous-Tio, Laura 29/08/2009
24. Cirstea, Sorana 14/09/2009
25. Wawrinka, Stanislas 15/09/2009
26. Anderrson, Johan 19/09/2009
27. Ferrer, David 22/09/2009
28. Jankovic, Jelena 22/09/2009
29. Ancic, Mario 23/09/2009
30. Black, Cara 18/10/2009
31. Raymond, Lisa 19/10/2009
32. Federer, Roger 28/10/2009
33. Pironkova, Tszvetana 31/10/2009
34. Wozniak, Aleksandra 01/11/2009
35. Andreev, Igor 11/11/2009
36. Chakvetadze, Anna 12/11/2009
37. Nieminen, Jarkko 14/11/2009
38. Tursunov, Dmitry 14/11/2009
39. Lopez, Feliciano 16/11/2009
40. Peer, Shahar 17/11/2009
41. Bhupathi, Mahesh 21/11/2009
42. Pavlyuchenkova, Anastasia 22/11/2009
43. Wozniacki, Caroline 23/11/2009
44. Fish, Mardy 24/11/2009
45. Querrey, Sam 24/11/2009
46. Bartoli, Marion 01/12/2009
47. Simon, Gilles 08/12/2009
48. Kohlschreiber, Philipp 21/12/2009
49. Koellerer, Daniel 30/12/2009

When asked about the triple zero entries the ITF responded:
The results you are referring to were missions that resulted, for whatever reason, in no sample being collected.

Saturday, June 20, 2015

CAS 2014_A_3751 X vs WADA

CAS 2014_A_3751 X vs WADA

TAS 2014_A_3751 Athlete X vs WADA

Facts
Athlete X appeals against the reversal of the Therapeutic Use Exemption Committee (TUEC) of the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA) from the decision of the TUEC of the International Tennis Federation (ITF). The reversal reduced the allowed doses of the hydrocortisone (HC) and withdrew the permission to use Dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA).

The athlete used medication because of suffering from Hypopituitarism and Adrenal Insufficiency, it improved her daily quality of life and she has had no androgenic side effects. However the WADA regarded the levels of medication as threat to her health and enhancing her sport performance.

Decision
- The appeal is dismissed.
- WADA's reversal of the DHEA TUE is upheld, except to the extent that the Appellant's current existing HC TUE is extended until the Appellant is granted a new TUE by the ITF TUEC, based on a proper medical diagnosis.
- The arbitration costs, to be determined by the CAS Court Office and notified by separate letter to the parties, shall be paid by the athlete.
- Each party shall bear her/its own legal and other costs incurred in relation with the present proceedings.
- All further prayers for relief are hereby dismissed.

Saturday, June 13, 2015

“They wanted the IV for whatever reason..."

An interesting story by David Epstein from athletics regarding a number of allegations being made against coach Alberto Salazar:
"... one runner recalled being tested four times in a matter of months for thyroid function — despite a lack of any symptoms — until getting a result that, while still well within the normal range, was deemed sub-optimal. The runner recounted finally getting a prescription for the thyroid hormone drug Cytomel."

"...Kara Goucher previously told ProPublica and the BBC that Salazar discussed with her how he coached Rupp to fake symptoms of dehydration in order to obtain an IV before an important race. “They wanted the IV for whatever reason,” Goucher says, “to make Galen feel better, whatever, and they were manipulating the system to get it.”"

"...Two former Oregon Project athletes described being told by Salazar to do a hard workout, and then run up the stairs to a doctor’s office to take an asthma test. “You sprint around the track, sprint through downtown Portland, and sprint up the stairs and go do the test,” the runner said."

Wednesday, June 10, 2015

"The chemists will always win"

John Cook, a former coach with the Nike Oregon Project, did an interview with Runners World. It's a pretty interesting read.

Some excerpts:
"If you take the testing objectively, and you never fail a drug test, as far as the average person is concerned, if you’re negative, you’re negative, and that means you’re a good guy. But that’s not what’s happening...

"...The average fan remains ignorant in terms of it wanting to be that way and wanting it be “Chariots of Fire.” Some of the people I talk to when I’m on the treadmill or lifting weights don’t even know the athletes make money. And they think if [athletes] test negative, they’re as clean as white snow."

"...getting a Therapeutic Use Exemption for an inhaler can be very easily done. If I take you and run your ass up and down the stairs five or six or seven times, then take you into the doctor, you’re going to be asthmatic and fail the test, and you’re going to be allowed to take an inhaler."

"...The chemists will always win. It makes no difference what kind of program you design."

Friday, May 29, 2015

Roland Garros Edition

Wednesday, May 27, 2015

Decisions in the cases of Kateryna Kozlova and Hamad Abbas Janahi

PRESS RELEASE
27 May 2015

Decision in the case of Kateryna Kozlova

The International Tennis Federation announced today that Kateryna Kozlova has been found to have committed an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in a Player’s Sample).

Ms Kozlova, a 21 year-old player from Ukraine, provided a urine sample on 16 February 2015 in association with her participation in the 2015 Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships event (the “Dubai event”) held in Dubai, UAE. That sample was sent to the WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal, Canada for analysis, and was found to contain 1,3 dimethylbutylamine, which is a Prohibited Substance under section S6(b) (Stimulants) of the 2015 WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods, and is therefore also prohibited under the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (the “Programme”). Ms Kozlova was therefore charged with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme.

Ms Kozlova asserted that the 1,3 dimethylbutylamine, for which she did not hold a valid TUE, had entered her system through her ingestion of a supplement provided to her by a doctor. The ITF accepted that Ms Kozlova had therefore established the means by which the 1,3 dimethylbutylamine entered her system, and that she met the preconditions of Article 10.5 of the 2015 Programme (reduction of the period of ineligibility based on no significant fault or negligence).

Ms Kozlova’s commission of an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme was confirmed, and it was determined that she is suspended from participation for a period of six months, back-dated to commence from 16 February 2015, and so ending at midnight on 15 August 2015. It was also determined that her results at the Dubai event – and all subsequent events in which she competed prior to the date of this decision – should be disqualified, with resulting forfeiture of the ranking points and prize money that she won at those events.


The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme is a comprehensive and internationally recognised drug-testing programme that applies to all players competing at Grand Slam tournaments and events sanctioned by the ITF, ATP, and WTA. Players are tested for substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency and, upon a finding that an Anti-Doping Rule Violation has been committed, sanctions are imposed in accordance with the requirements of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme and World Anti-Doping Code. More background information on the Programme, sanctions, tennis statistics and related information can be found at www.itftennis.com/antidoping.

 


PRESS RELEASE
27 May 2015

Decision in the case of Hamad Abbas Janahi

The International Tennis Federation announced today that Hamad Abbas Janahi has been found to have committed an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (presence of a Prohibited Substance in a Player’s Sample).

Mr Janahi, a 24 year-old player from UAE, provided a urine sample on 21 February 2015 in association with his participation in the 2015 Dubai Duty Free Tennis Championships event (the “Dubai event”) held in Dubai, UAE. That sample was sent to the WADA-accredited laboratory in Montreal, Canada for analysis, and was found to contain a metabolite of methylphenidate and 1,3-dimethylbutylamine, which are Prohibited Substances under section S6(b) (Stimulants) of the 2015 WADA List of Prohibited Substances and Prohibited Methods, and are therefore also prohibited under the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme (the “Programme”). Mr Janahi was therefore charged with an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme.

Mr Janahi’s commission of an Anti-Doping Rule Violation under Article 2.1 of the Programme was confirmed, and it was determined that he is suspended from participation for a period of two years, commencing on 27 May 2015, and so ending at midnight on 26 May 2017. It was also determined that his results at the Dubai event should be disqualified, with resulting forfeiture of the ranking points and prize money that he won at those events.


The Tennis Anti-Doping Programme is a comprehensive and internationally recognised drug-testing programme that applies to all players competing at Grand Slam tournaments and events sanctioned by the ITF, ATP, and WTA. Players are tested for substances prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency and, upon a finding that an Anti-Doping Rule Violation has been committed, sanctions are imposed in accordance with the requirements of the Tennis Anti-Doping Programme and World Anti-Doping Code. More background information on the Programme, sanctions, tennis statistics and related information can be found at www.itftennis.com/antidoping.

Friday, May 22, 2015

USADA Q1 2015: Anti-doping Tests for Tennis

USADA Q1 statistics are up:

11 Athletes Selected
14 Total Tests

Athlete Name
Test Count

Michael C Bryan
2

Robert C Bryan
2

Lauren Davis
1

Jamie Hampton
1

Steve Johnson
1

Madison Keys
1

Bethanie Mattek-Sands
1

Christina M McHale
1

Jack Sock
1

Sloane Stephens
1

Venus E Williams
2

Sunday, April 19, 2015

Ricci Bitti: Words of Wisdom

The President of the ITF has dropped some absolute pearls of wisdom regarding anti-doping in tennis:
"Quantity doesn't mean quality. The program in anti-doping has to be very focused and I'm proud to say the tennis program is one of the best,'' he [Ricci Bitti] said, adding that ''there could be a little bit more'' testing.
The ITF has the right to retest samples for a period of eight years. This has been used in other Olympic sports in the past to catch drug cheats from past years using modern technology, but Ricci Bitti said the ITF very rarely used its right to reopen samples.
"We retain all our testing and we can retest,'' he said. ''I believe in sports like the Olympics, this has some value because it's one competition every four years, but we test the players continuously, so it's not so important."
I can only assume that this means that the ITF doesn't consider it necessary to retest samples related to players that have been linked to Dr. Fuentes, or Dr. del Moral, or the Biogenesis clinic.

Do we need any further evidence that the tennis anti-doping program lacks competent leadership?

Friday, April 17, 2015

Nick Kyrgios: Tweets & Deletes

Nick Kyrgios had some choice words....that he quickly deleted. Have a look here.

I wonder who he thinks should get tested instead?

Thursday, April 9, 2015

Decision in the case of Francois Trawalter

Who?

Sample collected August 29, 2014.

Ban announced April 9, 2015.

Ban expires April 28, 2015.

Wednesday, April 8, 2015

"There's a code"

Jon Wertheim writes:
"The doping issue is peculiar. You hear speculation—immeasurably more than was issued just a few years ago—and while it often comes from members of the camp rather than the locker room, you proceed on the assumption that the coach/agent/trainer/botanist of Player X wouldn’t be expressing these views if Player X weren’t similarly skeptical.

Yet when players are clipped for violations, their colleagues close ranks and decry the system, the onerous testing and the feckless administrators. I understand that there’s a code. And the sense of brotherhood (the majority are male) and collegiality is admirable. But it’s surprising to me how often the indicted player is not disgraced, but rather has the public backing of his colleagues..."

Wednesday, April 1, 2015

Big Fish

Monday, March 23, 2015

Jon & Me (Updated)

The End....?